The most interesting Class of Computer Languages

In the previous blog  (XML as a canary in the mine: can Intel IPSC help stagnant C get its mojo back?), I mentioned three classes of languages that are thriving, plus one that I suggest is not. But that leaves out what I think is the most interesting class of…

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Using XPath to make Assertions is now a common technique

The idea of using XPath in a schema language about structured data probably first came up with Dave Raggett’s Assertion Grammars. This was a recasting DTDs that allowed (I don’t know if this part was ever implemented) the context element to specified using an XPath: called Conditions. I think of…

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How many developers think different?

The StackOverflow yearly survey came out today. This week I have been writing some posts thinking about what modes of thinking, jobs, technologies, debugging strategies might be suitable for developers with smaller working memories or below average short-term-memory-consolidation.  And I have suggested that the emphasis in the hiring exams of…

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Analysis versus Synthesis: are we atuned to each kind of thinking?

Does some of the supposed discrimination in the hiring policy of high tech companies actually have the common root cause that while the companies’ hiring regimes are brilliant at identifying useful analytical thinkers they are weak at finding useful synthetic thinkers?  (In fact, the regimes may actually weed out useful…

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Is XML only half finished? The X Refactor

The W3 Standard for XML is now 20 years old. I sent original of this post to the XML-DEV mail list suggesting a different vision for XML: reconstruct SGML’s power but as a definite pipeline of simpler stages, but without DTDs or SGML Declaration. (This version: 2018-02-13) Where is XML…

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Jürgen Rennau’s Location Trees welcomed

The Proceedings of XML London 2017 don’t seem to be on their front page, but you can find them here (PDF).  One paper that has really caught my eye is Hans-Jürgen Rennau’s Location trees enable XSD based tool. It seems to provide a great missing step in  making XSD (W3C…

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How to make your markup language pleasant: linear and unfolding

Why is Schematron relatively pleasant to read, by all accounts, while something like XProc (or XSD) is relatively difficult? Both are small, specialized languages which I have used in large projects, and I have been trying to put my finger on why I like one but am hesitant about the…

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“Schemas do not imply any semantics of documents”

I liked this quote by RELAX NG inventor Dr Makoto Murata on a mail list recently. I thought it was really clearly put. Here is the exchange: C:  The order of elements (in Schema X) {actually} seems to matter. M:  The schema allows any order.  But this does not mean…

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Validation result caching using a keystore

Scenario: You have a messaging or distributed pipeline architecture for your XML documents. An XML document make multiple stopovers from beginning to end, and a document may be stored and requested multiple times in its life.  Your documents go between different operations or groups under your roof, or comes from…

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Dream: XMON combining XML and JSON

To me it is clear that XML and JSON have complimentary strengths. And I would go further to suggest each needs what the other provides in order to be the most useful. It is not likely, but I put up an idea XMON on the XML-DEV mail list this week,…

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Schematron QuickFix

On the YouTube channel for the Schematron meeting at XML Prague 2017 is an update on Schematron QuickFix (SQF).   SWF is an extension layer on top of Schematron that lets you register one or more possible fixes that you can select: each fix is composed of various add, delete, replace…

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