Sorting out Log4J 2.0’s strict schemas

Log4J version 2.0 has two dialects of its XML configuration language: concise and strict. Concise mode is fairly well document and freeform. It uses the reflection API and plugins, so that if there is a plugin available, you can just call its name directly.  So there is no schema: the…

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How many developers think different?

The StackOverflow yearly survey came out today. This week I have been writing some posts thinking about what modes of thinking, jobs, technologies, debugging strategies might be suitable for developers with smaller working memories or below average short-term-memory-consolidation.  And I have suggested that the emphasis in the hiring exams of…

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Analysis versus Synthesis: are we atuned to each kind of thinking?

Does some of the supposed discrimination in the hiring policy of high tech companies actually have the common root cause that while the companies’ hiring regimes are brilliant at identifying useful analytical thinkers they are weak at finding useful synthetic thinkers?  (In fact, the regimes may actually weed out useful…

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Is XML only half finished? The X Refactor

The W3 Standard for XML is now 20 years old. I sent original of this post to the XML-DEV mail list suggesting a different vision for XML: reconstruct SGML’s power but as a definite pipeline of simpler stages, but without DTDs or SGML Declaration. (This version: 2018-02-13) Where is XML…

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Jürgen Rennau’s Location Trees welcomed

The Proceedings of XML London 2017 don’t seem to be on their front page, but you can find them here (PDF).  One paper that has really caught my eye is Hans-Jürgen Rennau’s Location trees enable XSD based tool. It seems to provide a great missing step in  making XSD (W3C…

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How to make your markup language pleasant: linear and unfolding

Why is Schematron relatively pleasant to read, by all accounts, while something like XProc (or XSD) is relatively difficult? Both are small, specialized languages which I have used in large projects, and I have been trying to put my finger on why I like one but am hesitant about the…

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TEI P5 3.2.0 Additional Constraints, plus tribute to Sebastian Rahtz

The academic-focused Text Encoding Initiative is a long-running project largely lead through Oxford University. They have released their latest update to their P5 version,  TEI P5 3.2.0 They now favour this One document does it all (ODD) idea, where they want to collect everything into a single document: metadata, text,…

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Lightweight inline schemas above structs?

The last thing I expect the world cares about is another schema language for XML!  But the XML ecosystem has had a lot of challenges with JSON.  XML comes from the markup world where your documents are made by domain experts not programmers, with the intention of abstracting away issues…

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Overview of Rust and Pony

I wanted to study some twenty-first century programming languages, open source and not coming out from a big vendor, and I picked Rust and Pony. Here is my potted overview of the features. Both Pony and Rust are compiled programming languages for highly concurrent applications, use C family syntax (like…

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Where is the Scrum in “Scrum”?

I have never really understood why the Scrum framework calls itself “Scrum”.   And it bothered me, as it must any right-thinking person with their priorities straight. The scrum in rugby is where the two teams form opposing battlements and push against each other, a ball is introduced to the tunnel…

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Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk reviewed: Lo-Fi versus Hi-Fi

Ben Fountain’s story has many of movie director Ang Lee’s tropes: the innocent boy making his way through a hostile world to an uncertain future, the adoptive father figure providing unexpected gentleness and wisdom,  the feisty girl with compromising motivations, Go West young man to escape the stultifying Nest, characters…

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